Mike Pompeo’s wooing of eastern European states is an attack on the union’s very existence, and part of a wider ideological battle.

 

T
he Trump administration not only dislikes the European Union, it is out to destroy it. The trip by the US secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, to Europe last week was episode three of the onslaught, designed to play on east-west divisions within the EU. Episode one was Donald Trump’s 2017 Warsaw speech, infused with nativist nationalism. Episode two was Trump’s 2018 moves on tariffs, and his tearing up of key agreements such as the Iran nuclear deal and the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty. To which should be added his open encouragements to Brexiteers, and his decision to pull out of Syria. All of the above affect European (including British) interests in very concrete ways, unlike mere tweets or insults thrown at allies.
Europe is trying to put up a resistance. Angela Merkel, Trump’s favourite political target in the EU, received a standing ovation on Saturday at the annual Munich security conference for her speech on the virtues of multilateralism. But perhaps we have yet to fully fathom what the EU is dealing with in this new Trump era. The man now whispering into Trump’s ears is John Bolton, his national security adviser. His brand of anti-EU ideology was on full display during Pompeo’s tour of Budapest, Bratislava and Warsaw.
Pompeo has done two significant things. First, he in effect took possession of this year’s 30th-anniversary celebrations of the fall of communism in eastern Europe by waxing lyrical on US closeness to nations that fought for their freedom – all the while giving a free pass to rightwing populist governments that the EU has put on notice for their democratic backsliding. Second, through his choice of destinations, Pompeo amplified divisions between countries formerly behind the iron curtain and those that weren’t. This astutely plays on sensitivities, manipulated by demagogues, that have marred the EU’s capacity to unite in recent years.

The latest major Trump resignations and firings
Read more

Some of it smacked of 2003 when, in the run-up to the Iraq invasion, the US defence secretary, Donald Rumsfeld, coined the terms “old Europe” (bad) and “new Europe” (good). But one big difference today is that the European project is struggling to keep afloat; back then optimists believed it would “run the 21st century”. An article Bolton penned in 2000 helps to bring the Trump strategy into sharper focus. Headlined “Should we take global governance seriously?”, it reads today like a roadmap of the Trump administration’s intent to destroy the EU. In it, Bolton lashes out at “globalists” who seek to tie nation states into a web of international norms and agreements that restrict sovereignty. He says a truly democratic mandate can only exist at the national level. Along the way, he hammers NGOs and civil society (“which sees itself as beyond national politics”) and the “limitless” breadth of multi- or supra-national institutions.The EU, he says, is “the leading source of substantive globalist policies”.

Bolton goes further: he identifies the EU as a threat to US interests (last year Trump called it “a foe”). “European elites” are “not content alone with transferring their own national sovereignty to Brussels, they have also decided, in effect, to transfer some of ours to worldwide institutions and norms, thus making the European Union a miniature precursor to global governance”. And he depicts the EU as “tinged with a discernable anti-Americanism”.

Never mind that Trump has arguably done more to bolster anti-American sentiment in Europe than any other US leader. What this reveals is that conventional explanations often given for Trump’s attacks on the EU are only one part of the picture. Trump’s anger at the EU as a trading bloc, his tactics to boost US armament exports to the continent, as well as his personal aversion to Merkel, are but the translation of a wider ideological battle about global governance.
Beware of thinking Bolton’s 2000 writings are outdated. They will only appear so if you believe the Trump administration has no ideology whatsoever, only commercial interests. It’s true that it’s a bit of a stretch to think of Europe today as capable of challenging the US on the global stage: in comparison it is a military weakling, and has endured a decade of crises. Yet it embodies something Trump and Bolton detest. And some of its larger member states are now trying to stand up in ways that clearly irk the Trump team – as with the new mechanism to sidestep sanctions against Iran.
Meanwhile, though liberal central Europeans may hope for positive US engagement in the region – such as Pompeo’s promise to support an “independent media”, and Nato deployments facing Russia – that glosses over what I’d describe as the “newspeak” contained in last week’s visit. Words such as “freedom” and “independence” flowed from Pompeo’s mouth as he paid tribute to those who broke away from communist dictatorship. But there was no mention that the EU helped to anchor democracy. The value-based dimension of the EU is arguably stronger than that of Nato – an alliance that for years included authoritarians (think Portugal’s Salazar regime, and the Greek colonels in power in the 1960s), and does again with Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s Turkey.
Pompeo’s talk of freedom, above all, echoed Bolton’s thinking. “All Americans celebrate their own individual freedoms, and are at least well wishers for others around the world to enjoy the same freedoms,” Bolton noted in 2000. However, attacking the EU, he added that the “‘human rights’ rubric has been stretched in a variety of dimensions to become an important component of globalists’ effort to constrain and embarrass the independent exercise of both judicial and political authority by nation-states”. Today, that thinking fits perfectly with rightwing populists in Warsaw and Budapest who complain about the EU’s response to their curtailing of independent judges and media.
With less than 100 days before the European parliament election, Pompeo had dinner in Hungary with its prime minister, Viktor Orbán, who wants to redraw Europe’s political map to suit his vision of “illiberal democracy”. They may have disagreed on Russia, and it’s true Pompeo did also meet NGO representatives in Budapest, but there was little sign of divergence with Orbán over values. It’s true also that Pompeo visited Slovakia, whose government thinks of itself as a constructive member of the EU, not a disruptor. But this was possibly aimed at drawing Slovakia deeper into the embrace of European illiberals, not the other way around.
Pompeo’s visit was a vindication of the enemies of a values-based EU, and another attack on the EU’s very existence. Postwar Europe was able to build itself up as a collective project thanks to US protection and financial support. Today the EU is the target of multi-faceted political offensives from both Washington and Moscow, not just because of what it does, but what it is. The earlier Europeans take stock of this, the better.

 

大人の歌舞伎鑑賞 競馬 シンザン記念で万馬券

4日あたりから徐々に仕事を始めていく。

4日は弁当屋と夕方から塾の講師

5日は一日弁当屋で仕事。

6日は午前中は友達を連れて松竹座にて歌舞伎鑑賞

土屋主税を幕見で拝見。

歌舞伎が初めての友人に役者の芸と品でみせる芝居はどうかと思ったが

始まる前に自分か土屋主税についての解説をして観劇

友人たちが満足してくれたので一安心。

あとでlineのグループトークで3月に東京に伺うのでその時に東京で幕見で歌舞伎鑑賞

を話したところ何人か興味をもってくれた人がいて驚く。

ランチのあと 家に戻り競馬をグリーンチャンネルで見る。

京都の万葉ステークスとシンザン記念をネットで馬券を投票。

万葉ステークスは外したがシンザン記念をゲット。

めずらしく当てたのが万馬券

朝から競馬ブックを読み込んでヴァルディゼールから馬連で流す。

レース見ていて内から抜け出したのを見ていけると確信

そのあとで前走1800で一着のマイネルフラップが2着に来る。

今年はちょくちょく競馬をやってみるので幸先のいいスタートを切る。

7日は午前中はクラウドで仕事。

文章を書いているうちに午前中が過ぎる。

夕刊配って塾の講師。

今年の年始はゆっくり過ごしている。

今年は仕事を調整してゆっくり過ごしている。

晦日は朝刊を配り終えると家に籠ってごろごろ過ごす。

時にはボーと過ごす時間も必要であることを感じる。

元旦は2時過ぎに起きて朝刊の配達。

元旦の新聞が年々薄くなっていることを実感する。

電子版と紙との共存はうまくできないものか日々考える。

現状は高齢者の読者が多く若い人の購読はほとんどない。

昼過ぎに梅田に出て映画を見る。

ファション デザイナーのヴィヴィアン ウエストウッドの生涯をドキュメントした作品。山あり谷ありの人生であるが自分が生きていくために自分らしさを求めて生きていくスタイルが好感を持てる。

2日は前日から頭痛で苦しむが松竹座に歌舞伎の初日を拝見。

土屋主税 河庄と成駒屋所縁の演目が並ぶ。

見ていて楽しめた。

河庄の壱太郎の小春の演技にこのごろの彼の充実ぶりがうかがえる。

家に戻ってぼんやりと過ごす。

今日はいろいろ書き物をこなしてから日本橋文楽劇場

文楽の初日。

ここ数日は結構充実しているかも。

師走の一日

昨日 一昨日 ここ数日は仕事のペースを調整しながら過ごしている。

弁当屋の配達をこなしつつ 正月の買い物などをこなしていく。

今年の師走の過ごし方はうまくいった方である。

塾以外で他の仕事を請け負ったためである。

あとは映画を見に行く予定。

これは作家の池波先生がエッセイで師走 大晦日を映画見て年を越していくという文を読んでからあやかっている。

先生は年末の仕事を調整しながら年の瀬をゆっくり過ごしていた。

先生は元旦から仕事をこなしていた。

ここ数日の自分を振り返りつつ今年の暮れの過ごし方はうまくいったと感じる。

起業にむけて

昨日は 昼間は弁当屋の配達、夕刊のあと西九条にて塾の講師。

塾も今日で今年はひとまず終わり。

今年は年末年始はゆっくりできそうである。

来年に向けていくつかやっていることがある。

一つは高校 大学受験に向けての塾。

ツイッターで募集をかけている。

インプレッションは日200~300あるが問い合わせはない。

これは気長にやっておいたほうがよさそうだ。

次はCrowd Workを使ってライティング関係の仕事を探している。

いくつか応募してタスク形式で説明文を書いたり テスティングといって

文章を書かせて契約できるかどうかテストされたりしている。

いろいろなルートを使って稼げる仕組みを作り出そうとしている。

軌道にのれば雇われずに自分のペースで稼げるようになる。

自分が好きなことでお金になる。

挑戦はやるだけやってみないとわからないもの。

来年はおもしろくなりそうです。

 

 

 

12月25日の日記

昨日はイヴで京都の南座で顔見世。

今日は昼前に歯医者。

歯の根の治療がはかどらない いつになれば終わるのか。

夕刊配って 西九条で塾。

冬季講習の最中であるが淡々と普段通りのことをこなす。

クリスマスもなにがどうなるわけでな普段通りに過ごしている。

普段通りに生きてくことの大切さを感じるクリスマスかな。

毒親からの手紙

土曜日の今さんの講演会で印象深いものとして茶話会での年輩の女性の

娘に宛てた手紙、本人は毒親からの手紙としているが 自分としては

娘に告げられなかった手紙 本人の告白と感じる。

自分はスタッフとして後ろから今さんの講演を聞いていたのでその女性をどことなくみていた小柄で華奢であるがどこか品のある女性、熱心に今さんの講演をメモしていたのを覚えている。

茶話会の最中、今さんの呼びかけで女性の朗読が始まる。

今さんからの話では午前中は神戸の長瀬さんの毒親への手紙の朗読会にも来られていて

引き続き大阪の講演会に来られたとのこと。

読んでもらう。

娘に対しての自分の子育てに対しての悩み 葛藤がそこに書き綴られる。

自分子育てに自信がないのにあるかのように振る舞い、娘に対して手を挙げたりなどの

虐待まがいをやってきたこと、そうした親の仕打ちに娘が耐えて立派な一人前に育ってくれたことに感謝をしつつ、娘に自分は何をやれてこれたのかという自問 葛藤 苦悩が女性の言葉の中から感じる。

口調はいいとは言えないが、ことばことばに力強さが感じられた。

胸が熱くなった。

今さんの著書 毒親への手紙を読んでいると毒親は子供に対して絶対的な存在として振る舞い 子供を扱う、物として。

そこにはなんら親としての情は見ることはない。

手紙を読んでいて親からの虐待を受けつつもせめて自分がやった虐待に対して何らかの謝罪か後悔があってくれれば親をどこまでも恨むことはなかってであろうという内容の手紙はいくつかあった。

手紙の内容から判断して娘に自分がやった子育て 虐待に後悔や詫びはいえてないのかもしれない。この場で手紙の形式で話すことで自分の娘にやったことへの贖罪をはたそうとしたのかもしれない。

あとあと考えてみてこの虐待の問題の底深さを感じずにいられなかった。

生真面目そうな容姿からしてそれだけ厳しく育てたのかもしれない。

娘は自分のやったことにたいしてしかっりとした女性となり離れていったのかもしれない。

救いは自分で抱えきれない苦悩を手紙の形で外に助けを求めてきたこと。

今度は自分たちがどう受け止めていくか。

個々が抱える悩み 苦悩を受け止める 聞いてもらえる何かがあればと

ここ2,3日考えている。